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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

ACE2 X-ray structures reveal a large hinge-bending motion important for inhibitor binding and catalysis.

The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-related carboxypeptidase, ACE2, is a type I integral membrane protein of 805 amino acids that contains one HEXXH + E zinc-binding consensus sequence. ACE2 has been implicated in the regulation of heart function and also as a functional receptor for the coronavirus that causes the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To gain further insights into this enzyme, the first crystal structures of the native and inhibitor-bound forms of the ACE2 extracellular domains were solved to 2.2- and 3.0-A resolution, respectively. Comparison of these structures revealed a large inhibitor-dependent hinge-bending movement of one catalytic subdomain relative to the other ( approximately 16 degrees ) that brings important residues into position for catalysis. The potent inhibitor MLN-4760 ((S,S)-2-[1-carboxy-2-[3-(3,5-dichlorobenzyl)-3H-imidazol4-yl]-ethylamino]-4-methylpentanoic acid) makes key binding interactions within the active site and offers insights regarding the action of residues involved in catalysis and substrate specificity. A few active site residue substitutions in ACE2 relative to ACE appear to eliminate the S(2)' substrate-binding subsite and account for the observed reactivity change from the peptidyl dipeptidase activity of ACE to the carboxypeptidase activity of ACE2.[1]

References

  1. ACE2 X-ray structures reveal a large hinge-bending motion important for inhibitor binding and catalysis. Towler, P., Staker, B., Prasad, S.G., Menon, S., Tang, J., Parsons, T., Ryan, D., Fisher, M., Williams, D., Dales, N.A., Patane, M.A., Pantoliano, M.W. J. Biol. Chem. (2004) [Pubmed]
 
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