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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} Increases Reactive Oxygen Species by Inducing Spermine Oxidase in Human Lung Epithelial Cells: A Potential Mechanism for Inflammation-Induced Carcinogenesis.

Inflammation has been implicated in the development of many human epithelial cancers, including those of the stomach, lung, colon, and prostate. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent pleiotropic, proinflammatory cytokine produced by many cells in response to injury and inflammation. Here, we show that TNF-alpha exposure results in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with a concomitant increase in the production of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, a marker for oxidative DNA damage, in human lung bronchial epithelial cells. The source of the ROS in TNF-alpha-treated cells was determined by both pharmacologic and small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategies to be spermine oxidase ( SMO/PAOh1). SMO/PAOh1 oxidizes spermine into spermidine, 3-aminopropanal, and H(2)O(2). Inhibition of TNF-alpha- induced SMO/PAOh1 activity with MDL 72,527 or with a targeted siRNA prevented ROS production and oxidative DNA damage. Further, similar induction in SMO/PAOh1 is observed with treatment of another inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6. The data are consistent with a model that directly links inflammation and DNA damage through the production of H(2)O(2) by SMO/PAOh1. Further, these results suggest a common mechanism by which inflammation from multiple sources can lead to the mutagenic changes necessary for the development and progression of epithelial cancers. (Cancer Res 2006; 66(23): 11125-30).[1]

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