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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Individual C6 glioma cells migrate in adult rat brain after neural homografting.

Cultured C6 glioma cells were prelabeled with the plant lectin Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin (PHAL) and grafted as a cell suspension (10(6) cells in 5.0 microliters) into freshly made cortical implantation pockets in adult host rats. Animals were killed 1-21 days post-implantation (DPI). The brains were removed, dehydrated, embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 8 microns. Paraffin sections were processed for light level immunofluorescent double labeling for PHAL, a marker for graft derived cells, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a specific marker for C6 glioma cells and astrocytes. Cells positive for both PHAL and GFAP were graft-derived C6 cells. By 7 DPI a large mass developed which extended above the surface of the brain and invaded (displacement of host tissue by a cell mass) the host parenchyma. This mass increased in size over the next 14 days. The invading tumor mass contained double labeled cells at all time periods examined. In addition to the invasion process, grafted C6 cells spread through the host parenchyma by migration (movement of single cells). Individual graft-derived C6 (GFAP/PHAL positive) cells migrated into host cortex surrounding the implantation pocket, corpus callosum ventral to the implantation pocket, ipsilateral internal capsule and bilaterally in the habenula.[1]

References

  1. Individual C6 glioma cells migrate in adult rat brain after neural homografting. Goldberg, W.J., Laws, E.R., Bernstein, J.J. Int. J. Dev. Neurosci. (1991) [Pubmed]
 
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