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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

High-level chromosomal gentamicin resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae (group B).

This is the first report of high-level gentamicin resistance in a group B streptococcus. Strain B128 of serotype II was isolated from an infected leg wound in 1987. B128 was resistant to high levels of gentamicin as well as of all other available aminoglycosides and was also resistant to tetracyclines. No bactericidal synergism was found between ampicillin or vancomycin and any of these aminoglycosides. Gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline resistance determinants transferred by conjugation into a plasmid-free group B streptococcus recipient at a frequency of 10(-8) to 10(-9) transconjugants per donor cell. No transconjugants were detected when streptococci of groups A, C, and G, Streptococcus sanguis, or Enterococcus faecalis was used as a recipient. No plasmids were detected in B128 or in any of the four transconjugants tested. By DNA-DNA hybridization, homology was detected between gene aac6/aph2, of E. faecalis origin, and a 2.4-kilobase HindIII chromosomal fragment of B128; homology to the genes aph3 and aadE, of E. faecalis origin, was found with HindIII chromosomal fragments of the same size (3.0 kilobases). Strains like B128, which potentially can be responsible for severe neonatal infections, are of great clinical concern, since there are to date no antibiotic combinations exhibiting bactericidal synergism against them.[1]

References

  1. High-level chromosomal gentamicin resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae (group B). Buu-Hoï, A., Le Bouguenec, C., Horaud, T. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. (1990) [Pubmed]
 
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