The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 
 

Characterization of the potentiation effect of activin on human erythroid colony formation in vitro.

Activin, also named FSH-releasing protein, was previously shown to induce hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells and potentiate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-E in human bone marrow cultures. Present studies indicate that the potentiation effect of activin is lineage specific. In addition to CFU-E, activin caused an increase in the colony formation of BFU-E from either bone marrow or peripheral blood. It had little effect on the colony formation of CFU-GM and the mixed colonies from CFU-GEMM. In serum-depleted culture, the effect of activin was shown to be dose-dependent with doses effective at picomolar concentrations. The potentiation effect of activin was exerted indirectly through mediation of both monocytes and T lymphocytes. Activin was also found to increase specifically the proportion of DNA-synthesizing erythroid progenitors from both bone marrow and peripheral blood. It had little effect on DNA synthesis in CFU-GM and in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. Addition of the monocytes or T lymphocytes to their respective depleted subpopulations of mononuclear cells reconstituted the enhancing effect of activin on the colony formation and DNA synthesis of erythroid progenitors. These results strongly suggest a specific role of activin in potentiating the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitors in vitro.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities