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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Transformation of human T-cell clones by Herpesvirus saimiri: intact antigen recognition by autonomously growing myelin basic protein-specific T cells.

Herpesvirus saimiri has recently been shown to immortalize human T cells. It was unknown, however, whether Herpesvirus saimiri transformation affects T-cell receptor (TCR) expression and signal transduction. In the present study, we have transformed CD4+ human T-cell clones specific for human myelin basic protein. The transformed T cells were grown in interleukin 2 and divided in the absence of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. They retained the membrane phenotype of activated T cells and secreted the cytokines interferon gamma and lymphotoxin, but interleukin 4 was not detected. Further, the transformed T cells continued to express the original TCR as demonstrated by TCR variable-region-V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies and TCR sequencing. Antigen-specific recognition and signal transduction by the TCR were demonstrated by myelin-basic-protein-induced HLA-DR-restricted secretion of interferon gamma and lymphotoxin and by myelin-basic-protein-specific proliferation. Antigen specificity and reactivity have been maintained for > 1 year after transformation. Transformation with Herpesvirus saimiri now allows the production of virtually unlimited numbers of (auto)antigen-specific T cells expressing functional TCR and a stable membrane phenotype. This technology will facilitate studies of the pathogenesis of putative autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, and may be of help in TCR-targeted immunotherapy.[1]

References

  1. Transformation of human T-cell clones by Herpesvirus saimiri: intact antigen recognition by autonomously growing myelin basic protein-specific T cells. Weber, F., Meinl, E., Drexler, K., Czlonkowska, A., Huber, S., Fickenscher, H., Müller-Fleckenstein, I., Fleckenstein, B., Wekerle, H., Hohlfeld, R. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (1993) [Pubmed]
 
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