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JNM1  -  Jnm1p

Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c

Synonyms: INS1, Nuclear migration protein JNM1, PAC3, YMR294W
 
 
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High impact information on JNM1

  • The JNM1 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for nuclear migration and spindle orientation during the mitotic cell cycle [1].
  • A JNM1:lacZ gene fusion is able to complement the cold sensitivity and microtubule phenotype of a jnm1 deletion strain [1].
  • JNM1, a novel gene on chromosome XIII in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for proper nuclear migration. jnm1 null mutants have a temperature-dependent defect in nuclear migration and an accompanying alteration in astral microtubules [1].
  • Although mitosis is delayed and nuclear migration is defective in jnm1 mutant, we rarely observe more than two nuclei in a cell, nor do we frequently observe anuclear cells [1].
  • The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRK1 gene, a suppressor of bcy1 and ins1, may be involved in protein phosphatase function [2].
 

Biological context of JNM1

 

Anatomical context of JNM1

 

Associations of JNM1 with chemical compounds

 

Other interactions of JNM1

  • One of these surfaces encompassed a region unique to Arp1p that is crucial for Jnm1p (dynamitin/p50) and Nip100p (p150(Glued)) association as well as pointed-end associations [3].
  • Moreover, genetic depletion experiments indicate that the binding of Nip100p to Act5p is dependent on the presence of Jnm1p [6].

References

  1. The JNM1 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for nuclear migration and spindle orientation during the mitotic cell cycle. McMillan, J.N., Tatchell, K. J. Cell Biol. (1994) [Pubmed]
  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRK1 gene, a suppressor of bcy1 and ins1, may be involved in protein phosphatase function. Wilson, R.B., Brenner, A.A., White, T.B., Engler, M.J., Gaughran, J.P., Tatchell, K. Mol. Cell. Biol. (1991) [Pubmed]
  3. Alanine scanning of Arp1 delineates a putative binding site for Jnm1/dynamitin and Nip100/p150Glued. Clark, S.W., Rose, M.D. Mol. Biol. Cell (2005) [Pubmed]
  4. Glucose induces early growth response gene (Egr-1) expression in pancreatic beta cells. Josefsen, K., Sørensen, L.R., Buschard, K., Birkenbach, M. Diabetologia (1999) [Pubmed]
  5. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by low glucose in cell lines derived from pancreatic beta cells, and may regulate insulin release. Salt, I.P., Johnson, G., Ashcroft, S.J., Hardie, D.G. Biochem. J. (1998) [Pubmed]
  6. The yeast dynactin complex is involved in partitioning the mitotic spindle between mother and daughter cells during anaphase B. Kahana, J.A., Schlenstedt, G., Evanchuk, D.M., Geiser, J.R., Hoyt, M.A., Silver, P.A. Mol. Biol. Cell (1998) [Pubmed]
 
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