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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The effect of gases in the intraperitoneal space on cytokine response and bacterial translocation in a rat model.

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine cytokine response and bacterial translocation after exposure of the intraperitoneal space to carbon dioxide (CO2), helium (He), and air (Air) in a rat model. METHODS: For this study, 120 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent anesthesia only (Control), 10 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (PP), or abdominal wall lift (AWL). The rats were divided into five groups according to experimental procedure: Control, PP-CO2, AWL-CO2, AWL-He, and AWL-Air. At 0, 3, 6, and 24 h after the procedures, the levels of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in both plasma and peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF) were measured, and the translocation of bacteria to the mesenteric lymph nodes was evaluated. RESULTS: The plasma IL-1beta and IL-6 levels in the PP-CO2, AWL-CO2, and AWL-He groups were significantly lower than those in AWL-Air group at 6 h (p < 0.05). The PLF IL-1beta (at 3, 6, and 24 h) and IL-6 (at 6 h) levels in the AWL-CO2 group were significantly lower than those in the AWL-Air group (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in IL-1beta and IL-6 responses among the PP-CO2, AWL-CO2, and AWL-He groups. The AWL-CO2 and PP-CO2 groups had lower incidences of bacterial translocation than did the AWL-Air group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study suggest that the gas in the intraperitoneal space, but not the increased intraabdominal pressure, causes the alterations in host cytokine response and bacterial translocation. Carbon dioxide may play a primary role in the reduced immune response associated with laparoscopic surgery.[1]

References

  1. The effect of gases in the intraperitoneal space on cytokine response and bacterial translocation in a rat model. Matsumoto, T., Tsuboi, S., Dolgor, B., Bandoh, T., Yoshida, T., Kitano, S. Surgical endoscopy. (2001) [Pubmed]
 
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