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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Association of serum apolipoprotein A-I (but not high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) with healed myocardial infarction in men independent of serum insulin and C-peptide.

Low serum levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or apolipoprotein A-I and high serum levels of insulin increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and can indicate insulin resistance. We tested the strength, independence, and interactions of associations between HDL cholesterol (or apolipoprotein A-I), insulin (or C-peptide), glucose, and CHD in 95 male nondiabetic patients with CHD who were <60 years old, in 92 probands from the PROCAM study, and in 61 non-cardiologic patients; all subjects were matched by age, body mass index, and smoking habits. Systemic hypertension (odds radio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.6 to 4.8), high serum levels of glucose (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8), insulin (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.6), and C-peptide (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2 to 7.5) as well as low serum levels of HDL cholesterol (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.5) or apolipoprotein A-I (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.1 to 7.1) had significant associations with CHD. At multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, glucose, apolipoprotein A-I, and C-peptide, but not HDL cholesterol and insulin, had consistent independent associations with CHD. Thus, the combined measurement of apolipoprotein A-I and C-peptide may improve the identification of nondiabetic patients at increased risk for CHD.[1]

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