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Prostaglandin E synthase.

Prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), which converts cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandin (PG)H2 to PGE2, occurs in multiple forms with distinct enzymatic properties, modes of expression, cellular and subcellular localizations and intracellular functions. Cytosolic PGES (cPGES) is a cytosolic protein that is constitutively expressed in a wide variety of cells and tissues and is associated with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Membrane-associated PGES (mPGES), the expression of which is stimulus-inducible and is downregulated by anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids, is a perinuclear protein belonging to the microsomal glutathione S-transferase (GST) family. These two PGESs display distinct functional coupling with upstream COXs in cells; cPGES is predominantly coupled with the constitutive COX-1, whereas mPGES is preferentially linked with the inducible COX-2. Several cytosolic GSTs also have the capacity to convert PGH2 to PGE2 in vitro. Accumulating evidence has suggested that mPGES participates in various pathophysiological states in which COX-2 is involved, implying that mPGES represents a potential novel target for drug development.[1]

References

  1. Prostaglandin E synthase. Murakami, M., Nakatani, Y., Tanioka, T., Kudo, I. Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. (2002) [Pubmed]
 
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