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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The novel adaptor protein, Mti1p, and Vrp1p, a homolog of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-interacting protein (WIP), may antagonistically regulate type I myosins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Type I myosins in yeast, Myo3p and Myo5p (Myo3/5p), are involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The SH3 domain of Myo5p regulates the polymerization of actin through interactions with both Las17p, a homolog of mammalian Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP), and Vrp1p, a homolog of WASP-interacting protein (WIP). Vrp1p is required for both the localization of Myo5p to cortical patch-like structures and the ATP-independent interaction between the Myo5p tail region and actin filaments. We have identified and characterized a new adaptor protein, Mti1p (Myosin tail region-interacting protein), which interacts with the SH3 domains of Myo3/5p. Mti1p co-immunoprecipitated with Myo5p and Mti1p-GFP co-localized with cortical actin patches. A null mutation of MTI1 exhibited synthetic lethal phenotypes with mutations in SAC6 and SLA2, which encode actin-bundling and cortical actin-binding proteins, respectively. Although the mti1 null mutation alone did not display any obvious phenotype, it suppressed vrp1 mutation phenotypes, including temperature-sensitive growth, abnormally large cell morphology, defects in endocytosis and salt-sensitive growth. These results suggest that Mti1p and Vrp1p antagonistically regulate type I myosin functions.[1]

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