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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Clinical, immunological, and virological effects of ampligen, a mismatched double-stranded RNA, in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex.

10 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), AIDS-related complex (ARC), or lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) were given 200-250 mg ampligen, a mismatched double-stranded (ds) RNA with in-vitro antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), twice a week for up to 18 weeks, without side-effects or toxicity. In all 9 patients who were positive for HIV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before therapy, levels became undetectable between days 10 and 40 of the start of therapy. 6 of the 7 patients with ARC or LAS also showed a progressive reduction in HIV load as measured by co-culture assays. All 10 patients had augmentation of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions. Other changes noted during ampligen therapy included an increase in or maintenance of numbers of helper-inducer T lymphocytes, improvements in HIV-related symptoms, rises in titre of neutralising antibodies against HIV, and restoration of proper functioning of the natural lymphocyte antiviral dsRNA-dependent (2'-5'-oligoadenylate/RNA-ase L) pathway. Thus, in the short term, ampligen seems to have the dual ability to restore immunological function and to control HIV replication.[1]

References

  1. Clinical, immunological, and virological effects of ampligen, a mismatched double-stranded RNA, in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex. Carter, W.A., Strayer, D.R., Brodsky, I., Lewin, M., Pellegrino, M.G., Einck, L., Henriques, H.F., Simon, G.L., Parenti, D.M., Scheib, R.G. Lancet (1987) [Pubmed]
 
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