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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

The efficacy of continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for pain management in burn patients undergoing skin grafting procedures.

Postoperative pain from split skin donor sites is often more intense than the pain at the grafted site. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study we assessed the efficacy of a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) in reducing the pain at the thigh donor site. Twenty patients, with a total burn surface area of 16% +/- 13% (mean +/- SD) were randomized 1:1 to receive either ropivacaine 0.2% or saline 0.9%. All patients received a general anesthesic followed by preincision continuous FICB with 40 mL of the randomized solution, then an infusion of 10 mL/h of either ropivacaine or saline until the first dressing change (72 h later). Postoperative analgesia consisted of propacetamol 2g/6h, IV patient-controlled analgesia of morphine chlorhydrate (2 mg/mL), and morphine hydrochlorate 0.5 mg/kg PO once 60 min before first dressing change. The visual analog scale (VAS) scores were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test preoperatively, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and during the first dressing change. The cumulative morphine consumption was compared with repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Scheffé's method if indicated. Patients with continuous FICB had significantly reduced postoperative morphine consumption at all time points (23 +/- 20 versus 88 +/- 29 mg after 72 h, study versus control groups, respectively; P < 0.05). In both groups, VAS scores remained low but were only significantly lower for patients with continuous FICB during the first dressing change (3 [1] versus 7 [3]; median [interquartile range]; P < 0.05). We conclude that continuous FICB is an efficient method for diminishing pain at the thigh donor site. (250 words) IMPLICATIONS:Postoperative pain at the split skin donor sites is often more intense than the pain at the grafted site. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study assessed the efficacy of a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block in reducing the pain at the thigh donor site.[1]

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