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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Natural phosphorylation of CD5 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and analysis of CD5-regulated genes in a B cell line suggest a role for CD5 in malignant phenotype.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) results in the accumulation of B cells, presumably reflecting the selection of malignant cell precursors with Ag combined with complex alterations in protein activity. Repeated BCR stimulation of normal B cells leads to anergy and CD5 expression, both of which are features of CLL. Because CD5 is phosphorylated on tyrosine following BCR engagement and negatively regulates BCR signaling in normal B cells, we investigated its phosphorylation status and found it to be naturally phosphorylated on tyrosine but not on serine residues in CLL samples. To analyze the role of CD5, we established a B cell line in which CD5 is phosphorylated. Gene profiling of vector vs CD5-transfected B cells pointed out gene groups whose expression was enhanced: Apoptosis inhibitors (BCL2), NF-kappaB (RELB, BCL3), Wnt, TGFbeta, VEGF, MAPKs, Stats, cytokines, chemokines (IL-10, IL-10R, IL-2R, CCL-3, CCL-4, and CCR7), TLR-9, and the surface Ags CD52, CD54, CD70, and CD72. Most of these gene groups are strongly expressed in CLL B cells as compared with normal B cells. Unexpectedly, metabolic pathways, namely cholesterol synthesis and adipogenesis, are also enhanced by CD5. Conversely, CD5 inhibited genes involved in RNA splicing and processing, ribosome biogenesis, proteasome, and CD80 and CD86 Ags, whose expression is low in CLL. Comparison of CD5- vs tailless CD5-transfected cells further demonstrated the role of CD5 phosphorylation in the regulation of selected genes. These results support a model where CLL cells are chronically stimulated, leading to CD5 activation and cell survival. In addition to CD5 itself, we point to several CD5-induced genes as potential therapeutic targets.[1]

References

  1. Natural phosphorylation of CD5 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and analysis of CD5-regulated genes in a B cell line suggest a role for CD5 in malignant phenotype. Gary-Gouy, H., Sainz-Perez, A., Marteau, J.B., Marfaing-Koka, A., Delic, J., Merle-Beral, H., Galanaud, P., Dalloul, A. J. Immunol. (2007) [Pubmed]
 
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