The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Differential distribution of G-protein beta-subunits in brain: an immunocytochemical analysis.

Heterotrimeric G proteins play central roles in signal transduction of neurons and other cells. The variety of their alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits allows numerous combinations thereby confering specificity to receptor-G-protein-effector interactions. Using antisera against individual G-protein beta-subunits we here present a regional and subcellular distribution of Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 in rat brain. Immunocytochemical specificity of the subtype-specific antisera is revealed in Sf9 cells infected with various G-protein beta-subunits. Since Gbeta-subunits together with a G-protein gamma-subunit affect signal cascades we include a distribution of the neuron-specific Ggamma2- and Ggamma3-subunits in selected brain areas. Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 are preferentially distributed in the neuropil of hippocampus, cerebellum and spinal cord. Gbeta2 is highly concentrated in the mossy fibres of dentate gyrus neurons ending in the stratum lucidum of hippocampal CA3-area. High amounts of Gbeta2 also occur in interneurons innervating spinal cord alpha-motoneurons. Gbeta5 is differentially distributed in all brain areas studied. It is found in the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA1-CA3 as well as in the granule cell layer of dentate gyrus and in some interneurons. In the spinal cord Gbeta5 in contrast to Gbeta2 concentrates around alpha-motoneurons. In cultivated mouse hippocampal and hypothalamic neurons Gbeta2 and Gbeta5 are found in different subcellular compartments. Whereas Gbeta5 is restricted to the perikarya, Gbeta2 is also found in processes and synaptic contacts where it partially colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin. An antiserum recognizing Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 reveals that these subunits are less expressed in hippocampus and cerebellum. Presumably this antiserum specifically recognizes Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 in combinations with certain G alphas and/or Gbetas. The widespread but regionally and cellularly rather different distribution of Gbeta- and Ggamma2/3-subunits suggests that region-specific combinations of G-protein subunits mediate signal transduction in the central nervous system. The different subcellular distribution of Gbeta-subunits in cultivated neurons reflects that observed in tissue where Gbeta5 and Gbeta2 associate preferentially with the perikarya and the neuropil, respectively, and suggests an additional association of Gbeta2 with secretory vesicles.[1]

References

  1. Differential distribution of G-protein beta-subunits in brain: an immunocytochemical analysis. Brunk, I., Pahner, I., Maier, U., Jenner, B., Veh, R.W., Nürnberg, B., Ahnert-Hilger, G. Eur. J. Cell Biol. (1999) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities