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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Immunological evidence that the nonhormone binding component of avian steroid receptors exists in a wide range of tissues and species.

A monoclonal antibody to a fungal protein has been used to demonstrate the presence of the nonhormone binding component of molybdate-stabilized steroid receptors in a variety of vertebrate tissues. We recently identified a steroid receptor in the aquatic fungus Achlya ambisexualis where sexual morphogenesis of the male is directed by the steroid antheridiol. This receptor resembles receptors of higher organisms in exhibiting an 8S, molybdate-stabilized form. In the chick oviduct, a 90 000 molecular weight protein has previously been shown to be associated with the molybdate-stabilized complex of the progesterone receptor. We have isolated a similar protein of molecular weight about 88 000 from A. ambisexualis and have obtained a hybridomal-derived monoclonal antibody directed against it. This mouse anti-Achlya immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) cross-reacts with the 90 000 molecular weight protein in chick oviduct cytosol and was used to detect analogous 90 000 molecular weight proteins in mammalian tissues. Tissue cytosols were incubated with antibody, and the complexes were isolated onto protein A-Sepharose. The resin-bound proteins were then analyzed by gel electrophoresis. This procedure revealed the presence of 90 000 molecular weight proteins in several mammalian tissues including rat liver, mouse liver and uterus, pig ovarian granulosa cells, human endometrium, and HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that the 90 000 molecular weight protein is not peculiar to the chick oviduct but is present in several different tissues from a variety of animals. This antibody should be a useful probe for further studies on the biological role of these proteins.[1]

References

  1. Immunological evidence that the nonhormone binding component of avian steroid receptors exists in a wide range of tissues and species. Riehl, R.M., Sullivan, W.P., Vroman, B.T., Bauer, V.J., Pearson, G.R., Toft, D.O. Biochemistry (1985) [Pubmed]
 
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