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TNMD  -  tenomodulin

Homo sapiens

Synonyms: BRICD4, CHM1L, ChM1L, Chondromodulin-1-like protein, Chondromodulin-I-like protein, ...
 
 
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Disease relevance of TNMD

  • Human antiviral antibody (antiHSV) was shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM) to cause the deposition of an amorphous material over the surface of infected cells and virus particles [1].
  • Studies with transmission and scanning electron microscopes (TEM and SEM) were performed on specimens from patients suspected of leukemic reticuloendotheliosis (LRE), irrespective of the final diagnoses [2].
  • The most common plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase is the TEM enzyme (Richmond-Sykes type IIIa), which is present in Hemophilus, Neisseria, and Enterobacteriaceae [3].
  • Production of beta-lactamases, and of the plasmid-encoded TEM- and SHV-type enzymes in particular, is the most common mechanism of resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics in Gram-negative bacteria [4].
  • PAP-1 potently inhibits the proliferation of human TEM cells and suppresses delayed type hypersensitivity, a TEM cell-mediated reaction, in rats [5].
 

Psychiatry related information on TNMD

  • TEM data from samples made after different reaction times suggest an ultrasound-induced nucleation and an oriented-attachment growth mechanism [6].
  • Fourth, the limited data available suggest that the genotype accounts for a significant fraction (equal to or greater than 40 per cent) of the individual differences in RMR, TEM, and TEE [7].
  • Recently, Quintana and others published the results of TEM investigations of ferritin cores extracted from the brain tissue of patients suffering from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) [8].
  • Perioperative TEM revealed metaplasia, disorientation, tubulus anomalies, compound cilia and one patient with short dynein arms [9].
 

High impact information on TNMD

  • TEM analysis of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) during development of renal pathology revealed focal multilaminated thickening and thinning beginning in the external capillary loops at 4 weeks and spreading throughout the GBM by 8 weeks [10].
  • Moreover of the bundles of microfilaments oriented parallel to the long axis of the tail seen in TEM [11].
  • The exposed adherent membranes were immediately fixed and processed for high-resolution SEM or TEM [12].
  • Seen by TEM, extending lamellipodia contain a felt of filamentous and finely granular material, distinct from the golbule/filament complex of the adjacent adherent membrane [12].
  • Although clavulanic acid exhibits more potent inhibitory activity than sulbactam, especially against the TEM-type broad-spectrum beta-lactamases, the spectrum of inhibitory activities are very similar [13].
 

Chemical compound and disease context of TNMD

  • A novel chromosomal TEM derivative and alterations in outer membrane proteins together mediate selective ceftazidime resistance in Escherichia coli [14].
  • Characterization of a new TEM-type beta-lactamase resistant to clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli [15].
  • Novel, plasmid-encoded, TEM-derived extended-spectrum beta-lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae conferring higher resistance to aztreonam than to extended-spectrum cephalosporins [16].
  • Propagation of TEM- and PSE-type beta-lactamases among amoxicillin-resistant Salmonella spp. isolated in France [17].
  • Two isolates (E. coli SH16 and K. pneumoniae SV3) produced CMY-1-like beta-lactamases, which play a decisive role in resistance to cefoxitin and cefotetan, as well as TEM-type enzymes (TEM-20 and TEM-52, respectively) [18].
 

Biological context of TNMD

  • Based on computer predictions, Tendin is a type II transmembrane protein containing a putative proteinase cleavage and two glycosylation sites [19].
  • The temporal pattern of ChM1L mRNA was examined using whole embryo at day 10 to 19 of gestation [20].
  • Single CD8+ TCM cells, but not TEM cells, could be expanded with cytokines, and the obtained clones displayed several distinct phenotypes, suggesting that TCM cells are heterogeneous [21].
  • Untreated NK cells rapidly induced membrane damage and necrosis in K562 target cells (as determined by 51Cr release assay and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy; TEM), in the absence of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis (as assessed by [3H]thymidine release assay and TEM) [22].
  • Substitution of Asp for Asn at position 132 in the active site of TEM beta-lactamase. Activity toward different substrates and effects of neighboring residues [23].
 

Anatomical context of TNMD

  • In 17.5-day-old mouse embryos, in situ hybridization revealed high levels of tendin transcript in tendons and ligaments [19].
  • Northern assays with mouse RNAs demonstrated strong expression of a 1.5-kb tendin transcript in the diaphragm, skeletal muscle, and the eye and low levels of expression in all other tissues investigated [19].
  • In adult mice, tendin is expressed in neurons of all brain regions and the spinal cord [19].
  • Four human CD8+ T-cell subsets, naive (CCR7+CD45RA+), central memory (TCM, CCR7+CD45RA-), effector memory (TEM, CCR7-CD45RA-), and CD45RA+ effector memory cells (TEMRA, CCR7-CD45RA+) were compared for their capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to antigen or homeostatic cytokines [21].
  • Basal lamina is not a barrier to neural crest cell emigration: documentation by TEM and by immunofluorescent and immunogold labelling [24].
 

Associations of TNMD with chemical compounds

  • Using a random, combinatorial scheme of mutagenesis directed against the conserved SDN region of TEM beta-lactamase, and selective screening in ampicillin-plates, we obtained the N132D mutant enzyme [23].
  • In contrast to studies in the highly similar TEM enzyme, we observed increases in clavulanate k(inact) for all mutants [25].
  • Recently, TEM beta-lactamase variants with amino acid substitutions in the active-site pocket of the enzyme have been identified in natural isolates with increased resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins such as cefotaxime and ceftazidime [26].
  • TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively [27].
  • The TEM studies on the sonochemically prepared catalysts indicate the formation of layered hexagonal MoS(2) (lattice fringes approximately 6.2 A) on the alumina support [28].
 

Other interactions of TNMD

 

Analytical, diagnostic and therapeutic context of TNMD

  • Molecular cloning of tenomodulin, a novel chondromodulin-I related gene [30].
  • I set out to integrate, wherever possible, pathological changes in tissues and cells as determined by light, scanning, and TEM with chemical, biochemical, molecular, biological, and genetic techniques [31].
  • Structural studies of these dendrimers were carried out using Tri-SEC (triple detection after size exclusion chromatography), intrinsic viscosity analysis, TEM (tunneling electron microscopy), and molecular modeling calculations by AM1 [32].
  • The materials have been characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, (13)C NMR MAS, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy, and BET surface area measurements [33].
  • The valence of iron doped in the TiO(2), phase formation, defect structures, band gaps, and magnetic properties of the resultant nanopowders were systematically investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, TEM/HRTEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, and measurements of magnetic properties [34].

References

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  2. Further ultrastructural characterization of hairy cells of leukemic reticuloendotheliosis. Katayama, I., Schneider, G.B. Am. J. Pathol. (1977) [Pubmed]
  3. Contribution of beta-lactamases to bacterial resistance and mechanisms to inhibit beta-lactamases. Neu, H.C. Am. J. Med. (1985) [Pubmed]
  4. Molecular evolution of ubiquitous beta-lactamases towards extended-spectrum enzymes active against newer beta-lactam antibiotics. Collatz, E., Labia, R., Gutmann, L. Mol. Microbiol. (1990) [Pubmed]
  5. Design of PAP-1, a selective small molecule Kv1.3 blocker, for the suppression of effector memory T cells in autoimmune diseases. Schmitz, A., Sankaranarayanan, A., Azam, P., Schmidt-Lassen, K., Homerick, D., Hänsel, W., Wulff, H. Mol. Pharmacol. (2005) [Pubmed]
  6. One-dimensional BiPO4 nanorods and two-dimensional BiOCl lamellae: fast low-temperature sonochemical synthesis,characterization, and growth mechanism. Geng, J., Hou, W.H., Lv, Y.N., Zhu, J.J., Chen, H.Y. Inorganic chemistry. (2005) [Pubmed]
  7. Genetic factors in obesity. Bouchard, C. Med. Clin. North Am. (1989) [Pubmed]
  8. On the structural form of iron in ferritin cores associated with progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimer's disease. Dobson, J. Cell. Mol. Biol. (Noisy-le-grand) (2001) [Pubmed]
  9. Electron microscopy assessment of the recovery of sinus mucosa after sinus surgery. Toskala, E., Rautiainen, M. Acta Otolaryngol. (2003) [Pubmed]
  10. Collagen COL4A3 knockout: a mouse model for autosomal Alport syndrome. Cosgrove, D., Meehan, D.T., Grunkemeyer, J.A., Kornak, J.M., Sayers, R., Hunter, W.J., Samuelson, G.C. Genes Dev. (1996) [Pubmed]
  11. Mechanism of retraction of the trailing edge during fibroblast movement. Chen, W.T. J. Cell Biol. (1981) [Pubmed]
  12. Changing patterns of plasma membrane-associated filaments during the initial phases of polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence. Boyles, J., Bainton, D.F. J. Cell Biol. (1979) [Pubmed]
  13. Beta-lactamase inhibitors from laboratory to clinic. Bush, K. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. (1988) [Pubmed]
  14. A novel chromosomal TEM derivative and alterations in outer membrane proteins together mediate selective ceftazidime resistance in Escherichia coli. Weber, D.A., Sanders, C.C., Bakken, J.S., Quinn, J.P. J. Infect. Dis. (1990) [Pubmed]
  15. Characterization of a new TEM-type beta-lactamase resistant to clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli. Blazquez, J., Baquero, M.R., Canton, R., Alos, I., Baquero, F. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. (1993) [Pubmed]
  16. Novel, plasmid-encoded, TEM-derived extended-spectrum beta-lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae conferring higher resistance to aztreonam than to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Arlet, G., Rouveau, M., Fournier, G., Lagrange, P.H., Philippon, A. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. (1993) [Pubmed]
  17. Propagation of TEM- and PSE-type beta-lactamases among amoxicillin-resistant Salmonella spp. isolated in France. Llanes, C., Kirchgesner, V., Plesiat, P. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. (1999) [Pubmed]
  18. Molecular characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases produced by clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from a Korean nationwide survey. Jeong, S.H., Bae, I.K., Lee, J.H., Sohn, S.G., Kang, G.H., Jeon, G.J., Kim, Y.H., Jeong, B.C., Lee, S.H. J. Clin. Microbiol. (2004) [Pubmed]
  19. A novel gene, tendin, is strongly expressed in tendons and ligaments and shows high homology with chondromodulin-I. Brandau, O., Meindl, A., Fässler, R., Aszódi, A. Dev. Dyn. (2001) [Pubmed]
  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of CHM1L, a novel membrane molecule similar to chondromodulin-I. Yamana, K., Wada, H., Takahashi, Y., Sato, H., Kasahara, Y., Kiyoki, M. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (2001) [Pubmed]
  21. Proliferation and differentiation potential of human CD8+ memory T-cell subsets in response to antigen or homeostatic cytokines. Geginat, J., Lanzavecchia, A., Sallusto, F. Blood (2003) [Pubmed]
  22. Nonsecretory apoptotic killing by human NK cells. Vujanovic, N.L., Nagashima, S., Herberman, R.B., Whiteside, T.L. J. Immunol. (1996) [Pubmed]
  23. Substitution of Asp for Asn at position 132 in the active site of TEM beta-lactamase. Activity toward different substrates and effects of neighboring residues. Osuna, J., Viadiu, H., Fink, A.L., Soberón, X. J. Biol. Chem. (1995) [Pubmed]
  24. Basal lamina is not a barrier to neural crest cell emigration: documentation by TEM and by immunofluorescent and immunogold labelling. Martins-Green, M., Erickson, C.A. Development (1987) [Pubmed]
  25. Probing active site chemistry in SHV beta-lactamase variants at Ambler position 244. Understanding unique properties of inhibitor resistance. Thomson, J.M., Distler, A.M., Prati, F., Bonomo, R.A. J. Biol. Chem. (2006) [Pubmed]
  26. Characterization of TEM-1 beta-lactamase mutants from positions 238 to 241 with increased catalytic efficiency for ceftazidime. Venkatachalam, K.V., Huang, W., LaRocco, M., Palzkill, T. J. Biol. Chem. (1994) [Pubmed]
  27. Preparation of Highly Dispersed Core/Shell-type Titania Nanocapsules Containing a Single Ag Nanoparticle. Sakai, H., Kanda, T., Shibata, H., Ohkubo, T., Abe, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2006) [Pubmed]
  28. Sonochemical preparation of supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts. Dhas, N.A., Ekhtiarzadeh, A., Suslick, K.S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2001) [Pubmed]
  29. Angiogenesis inhibitors localized in hypovascular mesenchymal tissues: chondromodulin-I and tenomodulin. Hiraki, Y., Shukunami, C. Connect. Tissue Res. (2005) [Pubmed]
  30. Molecular cloning of tenomodulin, a novel chondromodulin-I related gene. Shukunami, C., Oshima, Y., Hiraki, Y. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (2001) [Pubmed]
  31. Chemically reactive intermediates and pulmonary xenobiotic toxicity. Gram, T.E. Pharmacol. Rev. (1997) [Pubmed]
  32. Probing stepwise complexation in phenylazomethine dendrimers by a metallo-porphyrin core. Imaoka, T., Tanaka, R., Arimoto, S., Sakai, M., Fujii, M., Yamamoto, K. J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2005) [Pubmed]
  33. Porous carbon powders prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Skrabalak, S.E., Suslick, K.S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2006) [Pubmed]
  34. Pyrogenic iron(III)-doped TiO2 nanopowders synthesized in RF thermal plasma: phase formation, defect structure, band gap, and magnetic properties. Wang, X.H., Li, J.G., Kamiyama, H., Katada, M., Ohashi, N., Moriyoshi, Y., Ishigaki, T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2005) [Pubmed]
 
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